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Yazd

History of Yazd

History of Yazd

Yazd within its unremitting history has been going through epochs and oblivions. We are not very much aware of it`s pre-Islamic status and even after Islam had not been appreciated appropriately up to the Muzaffarid dynasty in which the first History of Yazd called "MARĀHEB-e-ElĀHI" by Mo`in-o-ddin Mo`alem-e-Yazdi was written. It is only in 9th century A.H. that two individuals, Ja`far-ebne-Mohammad-ebne-Hassan Ja`fari and Ahmad-Ebne-Hossein-Ali Kāteb authored `TĀRIKH YAZD` and `TĀRIKH JADID YAZD` and recorded the ongoing affairs of the society at that time. Respective history books were authored later namely: `JĀME` MOFIDI` during Safavid dynasty by Mohammad-Mofid Mostofi; JĀME` JAFARI` during Qājār dynasty by Mohammad-Hossein Nāini (known as Tarab-Nāini); `TĀRIKH YAZD (ĀTASHKADEH YAZDĀN)` during first Pahlavi by Abdol-Hossein Āyati and during second Pahlavi `YĀDEGĀRHA YE YAZD` by Iraj Afshār.The notable point about all these histories is that unlike other historical documents they were not only referred to significant individuals and events but the entailed physical outcomes and constructions as well which makes Yazd unique in this sense. Even during Muzaffarid dynasty who ruled vast areas of Iran, more than their biographical inscriptions, their developments had attracted Kāteb and Ja`fari`s attention in their historical records. That is probably due to the spirit of thrifty construction and minimal energy consumption attitude, which plays the leading role in Yazdi culture yet requires further studies and research.

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Marco Polo and Yazd

Marco Polo and Yazd

The city has a history of over 3,000 years, dating back to the time of the Median empire, when it was known asYsatis (or Issatis). The present city name has however been derived from Yazdegerd I, a Sassanid ruler. The city was definitely a Zoroastrian centre during Sassanid times. After the Arab Islamic conquest of Persia, many Zoroastrians fled to Yazd from neighbouring provinces. By paying a levy, Yazd remained Zoroastrian even after its conquest, and Islam only gradually became the dominant religion in the city. Because of its remote desert location and the difficulty of approach, Yazd had remained largely immune to large battles and the destruction and ravages of war. For instance, it was a haven for those fleeing from destruction in other parts of Persia during the invasion of Genghis Khan. It was visited by Marco Polo in 1272, who remarked on the city`s fine silk-weaving industry. It briefly served as the capital of the Muzaffarid Dynasty in the fourteenth century, and was unsuccessfully besieged in 1350−1351 by the Injuids under Shaikh Abu Ishaq. The Friday (or Congregation) Mosque, arguably the city`s greatest architectural landmark, as well as other important buildings, date to this period. During the Qajar dynasty (18th Century AD) it was ruled by the Bakhtiari Khans. Under the rule of the Safavid (16th century), some people migrated from Yazd and settled in an area which is today on the Iran-Afghanistan border. The settlement, which was named Yazdi, was located in what is now Farah city in the province of the same name in Afghanistan. Even today, people from the area speak with an accent very similar to that of the people of Yazd. People of Yazd are very famous for being peaceful, strategist, and hardworking. One of the notable things about Yazd is its very family centric culture. According to the official statistics by Iran`s National Organization for Civil Registration, Yazd is among the 3 cities with lowest divorce rates in Iran.

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